California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Bay Delta Region

Main Office
  7329 Silverado Trail
  Napa, CA 94558
  (707) 944-5500

Stockton Office
  2109 Arch Airport Rd
  Stockton, CA 95206
  (209) 234-3420

Regional Manager:
Scott Wilson

Suisun Marsh Habitat Management, Preservation and Restoration

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The Suisun Marsh is the largest contiguous brackish (a mixture of fresh and sea water) wetland in the western United States. The lands and waters of this unique ecosystem also are home to a wide variety of plants, fish and wildlife that depend upon a careful balancing of fresh and saline waters for their survival. It is also an important stop on the Pacific Flyway, providing food and habitat for migratory birds across the world.

The Suisun Marsh is located within the Bay-Delta estuary which means that its water quality is influenced by California's two largest water supply systems: the Federal Central Valley Project and the State Water Project as well as other upstream diversions.

These factors have made the Suisun Marsh one of the most highly regulated wildlife habitat areas in California. See more information about the Suisun Marsh habitat and extensive landscape.

In 2000, a joint state-federal planning group was formed to develop and implement a long-term comprehensive plan to restore ecological health and improve water management for beneficial uses of the Bay-Delta. Seven principal members of the group include: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), California Department of Water Resources (DWR), Delta Stewardship Council (DSC) and the Suisun Resource Conservation District.

In 2014, the Suisun Marsh Management Plan was completed. Implementation will be completed over a 30 year period and is intended to balance the benefits of tidal wetland restoration and managed wetland enhancements. Key elements include: restoring between 5,000 -7,000 acres of tidal marsh, enhancing more than 40,000 of managed wetlands, maintaining the heritage of waterfowl hunting, improving water quality for fish and wildlife habitat as well as providing other recreational opportunities. Complete details on the plan are located below.